Tag Archives: recovery

BIT (Bilateral Isokinematic Training)

BIT stands for Bilateral Isokinematic Training and my wife (who is a stroke sufferer) is currently undergoing this training by a trained Occupational Therapist. I did some personal research into this so call ‘New Technology’ or should I say ‘New Approach’ to treat people with unilateral (one side) damaged to the brain due to stroke or accidents etc.

Many studies and research are being done now to study the effects of this form of treatment and honestly, it is so technical that it is difficult for me to explain this in layman terms! I am sure you have noticed how babies when they kick, they often use both legs! This is what the doctors call our human inherent natural body Symmetrical Motion with respect to the mid-sagittal plane! Such studies comes under Neuro-Physiology.

In simple terms, BIT is being introduced into Stroke Recovery Programmes for upper body limbs training and there are contradicting research results from the medical practitioners. Some said BIT do not contribute significant improvements as compared to Unilateral training and others strongly recorded significant improvements! I went through the research papers and the test results are dependent on selected patient samples, extent of damaged, age factor etc. All I can say is that there are more proponents who observed positive improvements than negative ones.

In my wife’s case, she is on this program for about 2 months now and we noticed a marked improvement Continue reading

Sleep Disorder

Lately heard from a friend about her mom being observed for sleep patterns which are necessary for the doctors to determine how her sleep pattern affects her recovery process after an operation. The Idaho Neurological Centre did a survey on Sleep Disorder and Stroke Risk discovered the following :-

Out of 15 stroke survivors observed, all show some form of sleep disorder.

Obstructive sleep apnea, which causes a person to stop breathing temporarily and happen repeatedly was more common among stroke survivors than others.

Stroke survivors has stage one sleep (lightest sleep) and snored more loudly than others.

Between 31% to 70% occurs during sleep.

However after saying all these, Continue reading

Fall Prevention for Stroke Survivors

As high as 40% of stroke survivors have serious falls attributed to Balance Problems. Rock fell from the stairs twice and thank God she did not incurred serious injuries except for some vicious looking bruises and having aches and pain for a week.

People with balance problems often benefit from physical therapy. Your first step is to get a therapy prescription from your physician. According to physical therapist Sapan Palkhiwala your body uses a combination of three systems to stay balanced.

1. Vision:
This is self explanatory.

2. Vestibular:
The vestibular system helps by monitoring changes in your head movements with respect to the pull of gravity. It includes two parts: the central system (housed in your brain) and the peripheral system (in your inner ear). These systems are connected by the vestibular nerve. Strokes are more likely to affect the central system. If the vestibular system is injured by stroke, you may experience dizziness and imbalance

3. Somatosensory:
With the somatosensory system, your body uses information it receives from the pressure of your feet on the floor, and your ankle positioning, to help balance your body.

Sapan says a majority of stroke survivors have balance problems because one side is stronger than the other. He encourages survivors to build up their affected side by using it in daily activities, such as reaching for a glass of water.

Caregiver can bring a chair into a corner of a room. While the survivor stands in the corner, he or she can hold on to the back of the chair and practice moving shoulders and hips together from side to side and then forward to backward. This exercise also forces the survivor to use and strengthen his affected side.

If a stroke affects your vision, you can learn to compensate. If you have a visual field cut so that you cannot see anything out of the left side of both eyes, you can practice scanning the room with the right side of your eye while turning your head.

With the help of a therapist, survivors can also practice balancing on shifting surfaces like foam, grass, sand or seat cushions. Since your feet are not on a flat surface, you can’t use your feet to reference yourself. You are forced to use vision to balance yourself, thus strengthening this system.

Some Recommended Steps For Preventing Falls : Continue reading